Animal Kingdom

Director: David Michod.
Starring: Jacki Weaver, Ben Mendelsohn, Joel Edgerton, Guy Pearce, Sullivan Stapleton, James Frecheville, Luke Ford, Laura Wheelwright. Australia. 1h 53m

There is something extraordinarily authentic about Animal Kingdom, this sinister tale of a twisted criminal family is something can nervously be regarded as far fetched, but after an ounce of research into the criminal underworld of the Land Down Under, after watching this movie there’s a lingering fear that “based on a true story” might appear in the closing credits.

With characters like the notorious Chopper (2000) and the gut churning Snowtown (2011) just two pieces of projects based on real events and people, this just feels like the next step in a progression of a young country with a criminal culture that’s making up for lost time. Continue reading Animal Kingdom

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McQueen (2018)

Director: Ian Bonhote.
Writer: Peter Ettedgui UK. 1h 41m

Having lived through the mastery and magic of McQueens stunning artistry until his untimely tragic death, I felt as robbed as anyone who was inspired by the brilliance that McQueen brought into the world. After reading several books and watching numerous documentaries about him and his beguiling muse Isabella Blow (another character I hold close to my heart), I thought I really knew it all, but this thought provoking film brings so much more raw emotion and in depth background to the surface, including very personal testimonies from those who lived and worked so very closely to the legend. Continue reading McQueen (2018)

Short Roundup 14 April 2019

Sorry again for missing out last weeks list..When I started doing shorts I never imagined myself getting caught up in a series, especially as I don’t generally watch series, but when they are under 10 minute segments it’s less of a hardship! Also if you’re aware of any shorts that I really should have covered by now, please leave a message or tweet at me.

Kookie

Beginning if a young girl watching a vintage movie and eating cookies, this movie slowly transitions into something a little bit more sinister when the little darling has raided the cookie jar too much and the cuddly bear cookie jar is soon replaced by a freaky clown head container and things begin to get a touch more elaborate in the artistic fear department.

There’s a mouthwatering display of well composed atmospherics, creepy sounds and peculiar camera trickery that all enhance this spooky story until it’s WTF ending. I’d say is a really accomplished short and hopefully the little girl involved will go on to do more.

The Mother

A one minute short film doesn’t leave much room for messing around and this get straight to the grot. A woman is stalked by a monster while cradling her baby, year later the sacred survivor lays a trap for the monster..

It’s amazing how quickly a point and plot can be brought on in a movie, yet so many directors try to waste my time.. *rolls* eyes. Definitely some talent here

Monitor

An oversize clerk is working the night shift in an gas stop, the loser starts to notice strange going on with his radio and video monitor. A dark figure with a masked face is stalking him throughout the store but he can only see the figure on the monitor, picking up a baseball bat he tries to protect himself but the motives of this creepy stalker isn’t quite what you’d expect. I really enjoyed the twists at the end of this nifty little horror drama, overall it’s written and presented really well, there could be some stream lining here and there, but the overall camera work and cutting is perfect.

O Negative

From the shifty intro and inventive electronic soundtrack this horror really captures a specific emotive and scary mood, despite being a short wordless story about desire and dependency.

Starring director Steven McCarthy, in this intimate vampire drama that sees him travelling across country with his lover searching for meaty snacks for her.

A creepy story of love and endurance that sits somewhere outside of the Black Rainbow

The Outer Darkness Part 1

So the series begins, a group of people seem to be playing a twisted game of fate with a meaty cenobite demonic type of creature and a freaky sadistic roulette wheel.

It’s a blinding start to what seems to be a new realm of nightmare. The game doesn’t seem to be well structured but I’ll see where this goes.

Hotel 22 – Kinoscope

There’s something special about those people around us that have the energy and balls to get up and help those less fortunate. This story is about a night bus which travels around the wee hours and plays the role of a movie safe haven for the homeless people in Silicon Valley. A team follow the bus on one dramatic night but the massive insight is bittersweet.

Pictured

This is part of the Apartment Trilogy horror done by David F. Sandberg, think you might remember that name? He’s the guy who freaked out the internet with Lights Out and many other horrors.. oh yeah.. him! This one sees his beloved getting her pretty butt haunted by a creepy girl in a photo, it’s slightly Ringu-ish,it plays on a few more stereotypes but it does build decent tension and well done for another sleepless night!

Il bandito dagli occhi azzurri / Blue Eyed Bandit (1980)

Director: Alfredo Giannetti
Starring:  Franco Nero, Dalila Di Lazzaro, Carlos de Carvalho. Italy. 1h 36m

A somewhat whimsical crime thriller, Blue Eyed Bandit stars the iconic Franco Nero as Renzo Dominici,  mild mannered crippled and aged clerk who works for a bank, but little do his employers know what by night he transforms into a young, dynamic blue eyed criminal mastermind.


By day he shuffles around in a clever disguise, working long hours, visiting his mother in her nursing home and all the while secretly scoping out the office and waiting for the big pay day but as he ultimate heist get closer, Stella (Lazzaro); a loose member of the cafeteria staff starts to work out that there is much more to the old quiet clerk and she attempts to slide into the deal. Continue reading Il bandito dagli occhi azzurri / Blue Eyed Bandit (1980)

The Last Broadcast (1998)

Director: Lance Weiler, Stefan Avalos.
Starring: David Beard, James Seward, Stefan Avalos, Lance Weller. UK. 1h 26m

The year before the Blair Witch (1999) blew us away the Last Broadcast has already been released, but there’s a lot of nay saying about which one came first, it’s certain that Blair Witch caught more media attention and was reportedly started before this film but whichever way they were produced, this $900 film grossed $4 million at the box office which makes a much bigger success by comparison.

The film deals with a documentary filmmaker named David Leigh (Beard) and his investigation of the Fact or Fiction murder, where a group of TV hosts were murdered under mysterious circumstances,. As the show was only on a mere public access channel the death didn’t make the headlines and Leigh takes it on himself to find discover the truth behind the killings while making his documentary.

Continue reading The Last Broadcast (1998)

Titan Find / Creature (1985)

Director: William Malone
Starring: Stan Ivar, Wendy Schaal, Lyman Ward, Robert Jaffe, Diane Salinger, Klaus Kinski . USA. 1h 37m

I feel a little bad for suggested that this is just another Alien (1979) rip off, but it’s obvious that it’s highly inspired by the late 70’s classic, but it does a little something extra to the cult storyline that did develop from the Aliens comic spin offs. What really came a shock is that this film was released only 1 year before Aliens (1986) and yet it struggled to look half as good, and I’d hate to assume it was purely down to budget, but that’s not all of it’s woes.

In a slightly comical prologue a pair of geological researches from an American corporation start investigations on Titan, one sits on an egg like container so his companion can take a photo and a pissed off alien rips him a new one later the geologists ship crashes into a station with the pilot having died in his seat, somes like something from Alien huh.. Continue reading Titan Find / Creature (1985)

Moth (2016) – Post Movie Discussion

Director: Gergo Elekes, Jozsef Gallai.
Starring.Lidia Szabo, Jozsef Gallai. UK/HUNGRY/USA. 1h 21m.

Please note that this post discussion is a post discussion! Therefore it’s full of spoilers and discloses information about the ENTIRE film, including the beginning middle and yes the ending, and also these films…damn there is no other films like it..

So if you’ve not seen Moth (2016) or any of the above, it’s probably better not to read on, instead please check out my spoiler free review here.

Intro

For the most part this movie hinges all its energy on a very short dramatic ending. A tutor enlists a student to travel with her to the Ukraine to investigate mothman but is that all? Continue reading Moth (2016) – Post Movie Discussion

Moth (2016)

Director: Gergo Elekes, Jozsef Gallai.
Starring.Lidia Szabo, Jozsef Gallai. UK/HUNGRY/USA. 1h 21m.

I’ve never been so irritated by a lead character in any film so much as by the terrible co lead in this offensively bad horror. While I understand that English isn’t Lidia’s first language and have no problem with her thick accent and delivery of lines, she makes this constant clicking mouth noise in EVERY line of dialogue which really brought on a case of misophonia. I think maybe if the film was more gripping and she wasn’t so bad at acting it might not have been so bad. The rest of the cast, ie the director, makes a better effort as a more stoic broody Swedish born hero of the film he’s the voice of reason to his scatty partner in crime. Continue reading Moth (2016)

Labyrinth (1986)

Director: Jim Henson.
Starring. David Bowie, Jennifer Connelly, Toby Froud, Brian Henson, Frank Oz, USA. 1h 47m.

It’s hard to write to about films that have been around so long, that are so wildly popular, but alas it’s a film that I’ve seen; many times and therefore it has a place on my illustrious blog, but don’t expect me to take this review all that serious, because that would be boring and this film like so many other Henson productions always suggest that you shouldn’t take life too serious.

The film is a meeting of three great talents and a lavish history of children’s fairy tales, arranged and directed by Jim Henson’s who made a range of amazing creatures in all sizes, all built around the twisted imagination of renowned Brian Froud, and with the presence of David Bowie the film already has enough credentials for perfection, and it literally all the ingredients you need for the faultless fantasy film. Continue reading Labyrinth (1986)

Lighthouse / Dead of Night (1999)

Director:Simon Hunter
Starring: James Purefoy, Rachel Shelley, Christopher Adamson, Paul Brooke, Don Warrington.UK. 1h 35m

Lighthouse was a random find at the local library, without knowing much the cover and category of horror was enough for me to part with some change for the mystery DVD which turned out to be quite an impressive budget serial killer movie although while horror movies often have some infamous bad decisions this one goes overboard.

James Purefoy is Spader, one of a number  of prisoners are being transported by ship to a new prison, unfortunately they run into problems and the boat sinks, a small group of survivors manage to swim to safety prisoners and guards have to band together as a much more deranged killer known as Rook is now loose, and with his tendency to be the kinda psychopath who kills anyone he sees they do everything they can to protect themselves on the lonely dark island and their only refuge is a run down lighthouse. Continue reading Lighthouse / Dead of Night (1999)

Psychotronic Cinema