Category Archives: Movie Reviews

U-571 (2000)

Director: Jonathan Mostow
Starring: Matthew McConaughey, Bill Paxton, Harvey Keitel, Jon Bon Jovi. UK. 1h 46m

Now that Dunkirk is breaking records, it’s time to look back at all the occasions where they got things terribly wrong with war movies.  There have been a few films that tried to eradicate the British efforts and triumphs during the second world war. Continue reading U-571 (2000)

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Odishon / The Audition (1999)

Director: Takashi Miike. Story by: Ryū Murakami
Starring. Ryo Ishibashi, Eihi Shiina. Japan. 1h 43m.

Famed as being one of the breakthrough modern Japanese video nasties, the Audition has a sacred place in the hearts of anyone who likes the gore and chills turned right up, from the granddaddy of Japanese bizarre cinema, Takashi Miike.

Based on the chilling horror novel The Audition By Ryū Murakami (thanks to @GiornataNera  for the info, if you ever need someone awesome to follow on twitter check out this wonderful guy) and it captures an mesmerizing  dreamlike feel when things start to get weird the “deeper” throws of the movie. Continue reading Odishon / The Audition (1999)

Prevenge (2016)

Director: Alice lowe
Starring: Alice Lowe,Gemma Whelan, Kate Dickie,Jo Hartley, Tom Davis, Kayvan Novak. UK. 1h 28m

Alice Lowe returns after the brilliant collaboration with cult director Ben Wheatley in their darkly entertaining Sightseers (2012). She returns as an equally unusual character but this one is on a course of revenge with her unborn baby. Lowe might just have backed herself into a typecasted corner and to be truthful it’s okay, as she does this disturbing comedy thing way to well and we honestly need a lot more of her thing in the unpredictable British market where we like to be on the edge of wrongness. Continue reading Prevenge (2016)

Rememory  (2017)

Director: Mark Palansky
Starring. Peter Dinklage, Anton Yelchin, UK. 1h 31m.

This is stunning film with some haunting scenes, which linger in the memory but alas by the ending credits I felt as if something was missing from this well-crafted venture that took away the re-watch-ability.

Peter Dinklage brings an amazing character to life in this deep vibrant story. After having a few too many drinks he drives his brother home but the pair crash, leaving him as the sole survivor, his brother mumbles some words which he can’t make out and then he dies.  But Sam (Dinklage)  isn’t ready to accept that’s the end and writes to a brilliant scientist, Gordon Dunn (Donovan)  who has invented a machine, that re plays your memories, apparently we all have the ability to remember everything but not the ability to recall it. This Rememory machine is able to get into a person’s brain and recall everything from our first moment on the planet. It sounds wonderful and  Sam sees this as a chance to work out what his brother way trying to say, but one fateful night  after a disgruntled ex-patient visits, the scientist is found dead, supposedly of natural causes but there are bullet holes in the wall, was it murder or an aneurysm as the newspapers reported. The machine cannot be found or reversed engineered as Dunn kept everything secret. While his employers stress over losing the invention of a lifetime, ???? uses the stolen machine to find out what happened to Dunn and digs into his own forgotten memories. Continue reading Rememory  (2017)

Creeping Garden (2014)

Director: Tim Grabham, Jasper Sharp
Starring: Slime Mould, Mark Pragnell, Tim Boon, Heather Barnett, UK 1h 21m

This full length documentary is a striking creature feature detailing the exploration of a common yet wildly unseen mould, now seen through the eyes of scientist, mycologists and artists who have invested huge amounts of time in studying the unusual plasmodial slime mould. Starting with the history and covering the amateur scientist who identified and documented it’s existence, the film gives insights into Victorian scientific methods and how slides were incorporated as evening entertainment.  In modern times things are a little bit more unconventional and verges on science fiction as the seemingly inert plant controls a basic robot around a workshop floor, it’s predatory habits can be used to help people find water or a fire exit quicker and it’s motion and design influences visual and audible art. Continue reading Creeping Garden (2014)

Underverden/  Darkland (2017)

Director: Denar Ahmad
Starring: Dar Salim, Stine Fischer Christensen, Roland Møller, Ali Sivandi Denmark 1h 28m

Denmark has produced some amazing gritty gut wrenching crime thrillers over the years, but this one really stands out on the international scene with it’s ultra-modern approach to filming but the story remains so very familiar.

After migrating to Denmark Zaid (Salim) becomes a successful surgeon with a child on the way his life is bliss, on the flip side his younger brother has fallen in with a bad crowd and after a botched bank robbery he is left short of cash and needs help. Zaid has had enough of handing out cash and refuses to help his brother one more time and during a painful altercation he tells his brother to leave, the following day he’s pulled away from his work as his brother had been admitted to the emergency room, but there’s nothing they can do for him, after informing his parents he oversees his brother’s life support being switched off. After the funeral be becomes obsessed with that happened to his brother, going back to his boxing training he uses both mind and body to infiltrate the criminal underground to get  revenge. Continue reading Underverden/  Darkland (2017)

La Casa Con La Scala Nel Buio / A Blade in the Dark (1983)

Director: Lamberto Bava
Starring. Michele Soavi, Andrew Occhipinti, Fabola Toledo, Anny Papa. Italy. 1h 50m.

The literal translation of the title is The House with the Dark Staircase which is a little bit more appropriate; at least for the opening scene. Initially cast as a mini-series the film was scraped by Italian TV moguls for being too violent, so re edited as a much shorter film.

Starting with a peculiar scene a groups of boys dare each other to go down some dark stairs (hence the name) eventually one of the boys is forced down into the darkness where he meets his grisly fate, from there Bava leisurely  sets the pace of a whodunit with some impressive jump scares. Continue reading La Casa Con La Scala Nel Buio / A Blade in the Dark (1983)

Ragazza Tutta Nuda Assassinata Nel Parco / A girl killed in the park (1972)

Director:  Alfonso Brescia.
Starring. Robert Hoffman, Irina Demick, Pilar Velazquez, Adolfo Celi. Italy. 1h 32m.

I’m not sure what the fascination is with the Giallo scene and parks, houses being on the edge, and girls getting killing in them.  But this was a bit of a jumbled mess for me, I got the story but some of the characters were a little too bat-shit-crazy to make the film all that plausible. Continue reading Ragazza Tutta Nuda Assassinata Nel Parco / A girl killed in the park (1972)

Gangster Land (2017)

Director: Timothy Woodward Jr.

Starring: Milo Gibson, Sean Faris, Jason Patric, Mark Rolston, Peter Facinelli, Jamie-Lynn Sigler USA 1h 28m

Every now and again we have a revival of the glorification of the prohibition era, usually involving Al Capone and other characters popular because if his notoriety, 2018 kicked off with Gangster Land, an underpowered translation of the induction of “Machine Gun” Jack McGrun a one time amateur boxer who quickly climbed the ranks as Capone’s second in command. Continue reading Gangster Land (2017)

Le Temps Du Loup / Time of the Wolf (2003)

Director:Michael Haneke
Starring: Isabelle Huppert, Daniel Duval, Béatrice Dalle, Patrice Chéreau France/Austria. 1h 53m

Every Michael Haneke film brings something new and settling to the cinematic world. For this round he embarks on a contemporary rendition of the quiet before Ragnarok, where the film get it title from the epic Norse poem Völuspá.

Set in France, in an undisclosed post apocalyptic era, a family are on the run from Paris inner city and decide to trek out to their summer house in the country to try and scratch out an existence, the end of the world is never really disclosed but it’s evident that finding uncontaminated water. Continue reading Le Temps Du Loup / Time of the Wolf (2003)