Category Archives: My Favourite Scene

Favourite Scene – Viy (1967)

In this 1960’s folklore inspired horror fest, a young monk, Khoma;  is tasked with saying prayers over the body of a beautiful maiden who is in fact a witch and she terrorising him each night, the tormenting intensifies until the last night where the showdown unleashed all the goblins and trolls the witch can muster and the novice monk has an epic show down and has to basically exorcise the witch. This show down is amazing and I feel that for these scene alone the film should be recognised by more people. Continue reading Favourite Scene – Viy (1967)

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Ordinary Decent Criminal (2000) – Theft

Despite it not being critically acclaimed I really was griped by this movie, it’s a bit tongue in cheek and the cheekiness continues throughout the film. It really isn’t something that you should be taking too seriously. And with scenes like this art theft it’s easy to see that this isn’t a gritty crime thriller in the slightest. Continue reading Ordinary Decent Criminal (2000) – Theft

My favourite Scene – Robocop 2 (1990)

The Introduction a film can be key in keeping or repelling an audience…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsRUOQG92Bw
One of my favourite Sci Fi sequels, albeit not as awesome as Aliens (1986) but it has a natural progression from the first movie and realising that there was no new ground to break it just uses a corrupt worlds and plays around with the characters.. In the seedy part of the city there is an epic run by showing just far things have degraded. In this 5 minute scene the streets are littered with drugs, fascism, theft, dangerous driving,  robbery, prostitution, GBH and  few other things. What I really enjoy is how it’s all interlinked and how the motion keeps flowing. This incredibly short clip really paints a vivid picture of the battlefield our hero is going to have to take control of.

Hukkle (2002) : My Favourite Scene

The Jet Scene

At this point I haven’t actually reviewed Hukkle, despite it being an amazing film that blew me away with it’s beauty and simplicity I just can’t find enough great words to justify it’s brilliance so the review has sat on the back burner, but I will pick apart at the film for years to come and here’s the first installment.

Hukkle, which translates as Hiccup, is mostly silent and there is a happy old chap in the film who is constantly hiccuping, during certain scenes it’s as if nature is dancing to a certain beat and that is in tune with the hiccupping. Nature plays a huge part in this film which is really a pretty dark mystery based on the Angel Makers of Nagyrév. Continue reading Hukkle (2002) : My Favourite Scene

Silence of the Lambs – Hannibal Lecter Escape Dance…

The magic moment starts about 50 seconds into this clip, and for the life of me I can’t work out why it tickles me soooo much. Now the film is about a rookie FBI agent doing her own legwork on a case of chasing down a serial killer known as Buffalo Bill to prove to the powers that be that she’s eligible to be a real FBI agent. Part of her trial by fire is to interview a notorious cannibal and criminal genius Hannibal Lecter and a strange attraction builds between them. Hannibal, who’s painted as the most dangerous man in the world has over the top security, and still he manages to escape. During this gory breakout, the cops have to investigate and for some reason there is this shuffling around in the corridors that just cracks me up everytime I see it.

My Favourite Scene – Taxidermia (2006)

No matter how many times I see it, I adore every scene in Taxidermia (2006) even the pukey scenes I can deal with those and think they were executed brilliantly. But one scene that stands out is the bath scene… The film is a metaphorical socio-political retelling of Hungary’s history from the Second World War to the present day but this era is highlighted with this one scene.

I can easily write a book about this film and working through each and every scene but for now I’m sticking with this particular piece. The film deals with three generations leading up until the modern end of a line of Hungarians, starting at the end and then skipping to the beginning we are introduced to Morosgoványi Vendel who lives in a remote outpost under the iron hand of his lieutenant, Öreg Balatony Kálmán. During his menial tasks he partakes in slaughtering a pig he and a few of the fellow adults at the outpost tie up the pig, kill it and start prepping it, eventually it’s chopped up and laid out in a bath, the same wooden bath that was previously used by two of the teen daughters to bathe in, then there is “the bath scene” it’s absolutely stunning, several times György Pálfi uses this technique in the film, a revolving camera slowly picking through a mystical timeline. In this case it shows that the humble and primitive bath is a central item for the whole community, it’s a container for everything from birth to death, and everyone has their own personal moment in it.  The constant rotation that changes through every pass really elevates the feeling that the one single bath is used by everyone all year round through the process of birth to death, it’s a womb and a tomb. Utterly stunning scene.

Full review – TO FOLLOW