Tag Archives: french cinema

Un Prophete (2009) Cell Hit

Un Prophete is one of the most outstanding French movies of modern times, and possibly one of the best prison films ever in my honest opinion. It sees the induction of a young illiterate man into a hostile and dehumanising situation, after being picked up and slammed into prison, the nervous novice is prey to the more experienced inmates who force him to perform a hit (or bi hit), the person is aware that he’s a targeted man so Malik has to be trained on how to hide a weapon and to gain his trust. First Malik is tutored on how to hold a razor blade in his mouth and carry on a conversation and eat and drink without cutting himself, he’s shown where to cut to kill his target quick, the lessons and short and sharp. He then makes himself available for a private meeting with the target but Malik  gets nervous and accidently cuts himself, while being made at home by a victim, another human who is actually being kind to him, he has no beef with this man but if he doesn’t go through with the hit then he knows he’ll end up dead next. Continue reading Un Prophete (2009) Cell Hit

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36 Quai des Orfèvres (2004)

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Director: Olivier Marchal .
Starring: Daniel Auteuil, Gérard Depardieu, André Dussollier, Francis Renaud . France. 1h 51m.

I‘ve not covered a lot of French Cinema on my blog to date and I find this distressing and I’ll have to break this pattern as I watch a lot of French films, but for me some of the outstanding works of modern times are these slick and intelligent crime thrillers. For me this film is an excellent example of how to pay homage to a great director and film without pissing away the energy of a superb story and idea. Continue reading 36 Quai des Orfèvres (2004)

La loi du marché – The measure of a man (2015)

 

Lai Lou

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A marmite movie on a large scale, this film has really divided many audiences, and they either love and adore it, or switch off within minutes.

Thierry (Vincent Lindon) a married factory worker with a charming disabled son (Matthieu Schaller). At the age of 51, he loses his job and after a painful period of unemployment he eventually lands a new job as a security guard in a supermarket. He tries to make ends meet in this difficult situation.

I had to admit it, the film is in fact very slow, technically the story could be played out in a few minutes and at times it does feel like it’s dragging but it’s these situations which do accurately depict life and maybe scenarios that none of us have had to deal with that makes the film almost charming. Continue reading La loi du marché – The measure of a man (2015)